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corrective, Training

Fix your hips

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HIPS DONT LIE


Many of the movements for most things daily and sporting activities have us move from the hips down or hips up. Tight hips can pose problems where you wouldn’t even imagine, from shoulder pain to ankle mobility but i shall not go into that as it’s not the purpose of this article. Over in this article i will teach you how to get your hips more mobile and lessen the chances of injuries and make you perform better for sports….and might even get a perky butt while being in this program! No one will complain about a perky rear view(if you know what i mean).

Now let us take a look at some of the pros and cons are when your hips are tight/ flexible.

Tight Hips 

  • Low mobility of the posterior chain
  • Higher chance of having sciatic nerves impinged by piriformis
  • Higher chances of injuries due to compensation on other areas
  • Poor glute activation leading to injuries to the lower back(lumbar area)
  • Externally rotated femur causing misalignment and bad weight distribution
  • Internally rotated tibia causing a torque on the knees
  • Low athletic performance e.g. running etc

Flexible Hips

  • High mobility of the posterior chain
  • Lower chance of having sciatic nerves impinged by piriformis
  • Lower chances of injuries due to compensation on other areas
  • Good glute activation leading to lower rate of injuries to the lower back(Glutes help take load off)
  • Not rotated femur(proper tracking) allows better weight distribution
  • Properly aligned tibia causing no torque on the knees
  • High athletic performance e.g. better stride for running

(With all that being said, i hope you can see and that your’re doing some stretches while reading this now as Im starting to feel tight sitting down here typing this).

 

There are maaaaany ways to go around this but since i would find the easiest ways and bang for your money drills, these few tips should get you moving those hips well enough and start your mobility journey:

 

 

Tip#1 Hip hinge movement pattern

Hip push backs:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Kettlebell:

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Barbell/dbell:

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Tip#2 Stretching those tight spots

Contralateral hip/ inner thighs:(VIDEO INSTRUCTION)
Frog stretch: (VIDEO INSTRUCTION)
Hip/ psoas: (VIDEO INSTRUCTION)
Glutes(sitting): (VIDEO INSTRUCTION)

 

Tip#3 Ballistic them away
Back kicks:(VIDEO INSTRUCTION)

Hip/ Psoas:(VIDEO INSTRUCTION)

Toy soldier:(VIDEO INSTRUCTION)

 

Tip#4 Dynamic is key

Hip/ psoas/ obliques/ lats:(VIDEO INSTRUCTION)

Toe touch(modified):(PIC BELOW)

vs_fitness_4_1302

 

 

Tip#5 Know the difference

-knowing the difference between knee dominant and hip dominant is the utmost important thing as you can immediately change the weight distribution to different parts of the body and make your workouts better and safer knowing you’re  in the right position to maximise your workouts.

Knee dominant:(PIC BELOW)

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Hip dominant:(PIC BELOW)

Swing

 

Tip#6 Check up
Toe touch:

The simplest test you can do to check hamstrings/ hips is the toe touch. Ideally you should be able to touch your toes. Do this test weekly.

Screen Shot 2015-02-27 at 5.32.47 pm

 


 

How to incorporate the stretches into your workouts. You can do them in the order given below.

Before workout= Dynamic/ballistics

During workout= Dynamic

Post workout= Static/ dynamic.

 

Static stretches are normally held for anywhere from fifteen seconds to a minute and a half. Can be done for time and repetition based.

Dynamic stretches are normally in a movement based pattern to warm the body for loading and get the joints “greased up”. Best done in a repetition based.

Ballistics are normally used for specific movements say box jumps/ air jump squats before you work sets for weighted squats or arms swings before the swim. Done for short period of time or repetitions.

 

Get cracking now and let me know how it’s coming along!

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About Jab

Delusionally Optimistic Personal Trainer and Manual Therapist. Lifetime foodie advocate.

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